Whence came the ‘Baby Ruth?’

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webmaster | 05/15/12
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For almost 100 years, Americans have been in love with Baby Ruth candy bars. The log-shaped, chocolatecovered caramel and peanut bar has titillated our palates since 1921, but in the beginning all was not well.

The candy bar had barely made its appearance when a huge court fight broke out over the origin of its name. Somebody cried “foul” because they claimed it was named after Babe Ruth, the baseball player.

It was Otto Schnering, owner of the Curtiss Candy Co., who came up with the idea for the confection, and it immediately won a huge following. But, like we said, not everyone was celebrating. One of Schnering’s competitors, with the full approval of the home run king, had its own candy bar, and they called their product the “Babe Ruth Home Run Bar.”

This all happened as baseball great George Herman “Babe” Ruth was becoming one of the most famous people in America. He had established himself as an outfield star with the New York Yankees, and by 1921, his name was featured more prominently on the front pages of the afternoon newspapers than President Harding. That’s when Schnering changed his “Kandy Kake” to “Baby Ruth,” and his competition took him to court over the name he had chosen...

 

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