The Stars and Bars still wave

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webmaster | 06/26/12
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The Rebels may have lost the Civil War, but “Dixie” is still being played, and the Confederate battle flags are still flying down South — way, way down South, like in South America.

That’s right, the Stars and Bars are still flying in Brazil today as the result of an emmigration of thousands of Southern expatriates who journeyed there shortly after their loss in the War of the Rebellion.

Under the leadership of Confederate Col. William Hutchinson Norris, the southerners went into self-imposed exile after the war and established a colony called Americana. There they continued their southern way of life, including the preservation of their peculiar institution, slavery, which was not abolished in Brazil until 1888.

The Southern-style plantations prospered, and soon a second and third generation of Confederados, as they came to be known in Brazil, replaced those first immigrants. In time nature had its way, and the children and grandchildren of the Southern expatriates intermarried with the general population...

 

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