One needs to watch for satchel bombs

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webmaster | 02/19/13
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A homeowner in Eureka noticed something suspicious in his front yard and called the police. It turned out to be a rather poorly made, yet lethal satchel bomb. It didn’t go off, but one wonders what sort of neighborhood that is.

Most neighborhoods in Madera are calm and quiet, except when gang members start shooting at each other. But that isn’t an every-night event.

Our neighborhood is calm and quiet, except for the occasional cat fight and barking dogs.

“Barking is a dog’s television,” someone told me, and I think that is true part of the time. But I think dogs also bark to warn their owners that a stranger is near the house, or it may warn the stranger the dog is in charge and means business.

Would a barking dog have driven away a satchel bomber from that yard in Eureka. Who knows?

Quite a bit of marijuana growing goes on in Eureka, and I think if I were in that business, I would have a dog to warn the satchel bombers they had better stay in their own yards.

The 2nd Amendment to the Constitution is no license for satchel bombers to carry out their tasks. The 2nd Amendment allows us to keep and bear arms, but it does not allow us to keep and bear satchel bombs. I'm not sure about cannons, either.

I knew a man years ago in Seattle who had an antique cannon in his front yard. He called his house Cannon House, and the gun, which had been recovered from an 1800s shipwreck, was aimed at a neighbor’s garage across the street. The neighbor wasn’t happy about this, although the owner of Cannon House assured his neighbor he had no intention of firing the antique.

The neighbor got a big dog, though and aimed it at the cannon, more or less.

It was a standoff.

 

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