Monkey see monkey do

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webmaster | 01/18/14
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According to a Nielsen Company report on www.goodhousekeeping.com, children watch seven hours and 38 minutes of television every day, almost the equivalent of working a full-time job. Programing that is inappropriate for kids turns mom and dad into the media police.

Even much of the prime time family hour programing shows kids behaving badly for a laugh. I hope parents can convince their kids there is a difference between entertainment and acceptable behavior. Mimicking the high jinks of TV actors can land a kid in a world of trouble. Hence monkey see, monkey do.

Advertising on television, especially on major sporting events such as the upcoming Super Bowl, can cost $4.5 million for a 30-second spot, according to CBS News. After the game, the merits of the ads will be as much a part of the post-game discussion as the game. Can the average consumer envision spending that kind of money on something tangible, much less a TV spot? That money in the hands of a good cause could do so much good. It seems like a waste of resources.

The companies selling products during the big game are not aiming at my demographic. Since I don’t drink beer, eat yogurt or corn chips, or need a new car, the ads won’t persuade me to buy any of those products. However candy bars and soft drinks are also scheduled to be featured and I do like those...

 

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