Little rules to live by are actually big

Note: Most newspaper content reprinted here is incomplete and delayed. Want it all? Sooner? You can subscribe to our full print and online editions by calling (559) 674-4207 and get both editions for the price of one!

webmaster | 04/06/12
Author(s): 

We all have heard little rules to live by, and depending on who you are, they may mean a lot to you or not much at all.

A good example is the so called Golden Rule: “Do for others as you would have them do for you.” In Luke 6:31, that is said to be a quote from Jesus in his sermon known as The Beatitudes.

A quote attributed to Hillel, a Jewish rabbi who lived around the time of Jesus, puts the Golden Rule this way: “What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbor; that is the whole Torah, while the rest is commentary.”

Confucius, who lived about 500 years before Jesus or Hillel, summed up the Golden Rule this way: “Do not do to others what you would not want others to do to you.”

Of course, there is the reverse Golden Rule, which is: “Do unto others before they have a chance to do unto you.”

And this discourse on living: “There will be times when good neighbors are more important than a good neighborhood.”

And this one: “Pointedly praising something unusual a person owns or has done will make you appear far smarter in his or her eyes than a 10- minute discourse on world events.”

Here’s another: “If you think you’re getting fat, you probably are; if someone tells you otherwise, they’re probably lying.”

From a list of Scottish proverbs: “Don’t marry for money, you can borrow it cheaper,” and “Never let your feet run faster than your shoes,” and also, “He’s the slave of all slaves who serves none but himself.”

And from Proverbs: “Do not do as the wicked do, or follow the path of evildoers. Avoid their haunts. Turn away and go somewhere else, for evil people cannot sleep until they have done their evil deed for the day.”

All good advice.

 

comments powered by Disqus