A little background on Jodi Arias

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webmaster | 05/09/13
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Jodi Arias, who was found guilty Tuesday of first-degree murder by a Phoenix jury, is a textbook sociopath, according to Scott Bonn, writing in the Huffington Post. Sociopaths can seem normal, even endearing, but they have a hole inside them. That hole is where a conscience would be in a normal person.

When the sociopath does something wrong, and gets caught, she or he has little remorse over the deed itself. What they regret is being caught at it.

The surprise is that Arias’ crime was so violent. Sociopaths will lie, cheat and steal if it suits their needs, but they seldom resort to violence. That’s mainly because they don’t want to get hurt. Doing violence to another is okay for the sociopath, but only if the sociopath believes he or she can avoid violence in return.

According to the publication Business Insider, Arias was born in Salinas, moved with her family to Yreka and attended Yreka Union High School, “where she was a good girl who didn’t seem the slight bit off (that some say she was).” She dropped out of high school in the 11th grade.

During her 20s, she worked at various low-paying jobs, and dated what she called cheating boyfriends.

She eventually went to work for a company called Prepaid Legal Services as a commission saleswoman working from her home, which at that time was in Palm Desert. It was at a company conference for Prepaid Legal where she met Travis Alexander, the man she eventually would murder. That was in 2006. From then until she killed him in 2008, the two exchanged 82,000 emails, according to court records quoted by the Huffington Post.

That’s two years, or about 730 days, or an average of 112 emails a day. No wonder he got tired of her. When did either of them find time for anything else?

 

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