How will Dems use their new power?

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webmaster | 11/14/12
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The recent election apparently has resulted in providing the Democrats with a 2/3 or more majority in both the state Senate an Assembly. Another name for it is supermajority. Whatever you call it, the result could be that the Legislature could do just about whatever it wants.

Writing in the San Francisco Chronicle, Wyatt Buchanan describes the situation thusly: “A 2/3 majority allows the Legislature not only to raise taxes, but also to put constitutional amendments on the ballot on its own, override vetoes and pass bills theat go into effect the moment they are signed instead of the next year, among other things.”

That is a lot of power.

That notion assumes, however, that all the Democrats would agree on everything, and that may not happen. Not all Democrats are lefties who want to raise taxes and regulate everything.

In fact many Democrats were quite conservative.

Franklin Roosevelt often was described as too conservative, by some Republicans and many Democrats alike. He wanted a balanced budget, a strong military and a vibrant economy. Over the years, he had to fight to get them as hard as he had to fight to get Social Security passed.

Harry Truman was so conservative he left office a relatively poor man, which would be unheard of today. He fought communism, even to the point of engaging the nation in the Korean War.

John Kennedy campaigned against what he called a “missile gap” with the Soviet Union. We needed a stronger military, said he, a decorated veteran of World War II. He also championed tax cuts.

So don’t be too sure all the Democrats will be in lock step whenever Democratic leaders decide they want a new tax or new regulation. All that power may scare some Dems who won’t want to be blamed for abusing it.

 

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