Don’t worry; he’s no data hog

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webmaster | 01/28/12
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Some smart-phone users apparently are getting themselves into the same trouble that some computer users encountered a couple of years ago — they are over-using the capacity of their data vendors.

The Wall Street Journal reports that AT&T is warning data hogs that they could encounter service slowdowns if they don’t ease up on how much time they spend on the phone.

That may worry you, but it doesn’t worry me. I have a not-so-smart phone, and I’m a long way from using 2 gigabytes a month worth of data. In fact, I use so little data that I think my cell phone carrier wonders whether I’m still alive.

I’m not bragging. I don’t think it’s a source of pride to use my cell phone so sparingly. I have colleagues who can use their phones to access the Internet, listen to music, send and receive emails and, for all I know, launch rocket ships. I also know being able to do that costs them money — more money, at any rate, than I spend on my cell phone.

I pay about as much for my bill as I would pay for a string between two cans.

I have one friend who spends $200 a month on phone and computer access to cyberspace, and thinks he is getting a good deal.

I inadvertently left my cell phone at home the other day. It was in the pocket of one of my coats. I didn’t miss it at all, but when I went home for lunch, Mrs. Doud asked me where on earth I had been. She had been trying to call me on my cell phone and I hadn’t answered.

I guess we are expected to have our cell phones with us, even if we don’t log onto the rest of the world. The rest of the world wants to log onto us.

My cell phone company keeps sending me text messages, and I keep deleting them without reading what they say. Maybe they, too, want to know where I am.

 

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