Developing new sleep habits

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webmaster | 03/01/12
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Most parents have trouble getting their small children to sleep at night. My parents had problems waking me up. While other kids were begging to stay up for an extra 30 minutes, I was fast asleep in the corner, curled up with a Big Bird blanket and my plaid teddy bear.

I happily slept through movies, parties, and wedding receptions — even once an off-Broadway production of “Beauty and the Beast.” (Just to clarify, these events weren’t happening when I was a toddler. I “watched” Beauty and the Beast when I was at least 12.)

Even in high school, I needed loads of sleep. While many of my classmates stayed up till 2 a.m. studying, checking Facebook and watching Nick at Nite, I was usually fast asleep by 11. My mother compares me to an infant: If I get less than nine hours of sleep, I’m fussy the next day.

When I got to college, though, I was forced to adjust my sleep schedule — and quickly. During orientation week, I stayed up until 3 or 4 a.m. every night. Although I was exhausted for the entire week, I relished these wee hours of the morning, because they were the times when I forged deep friendships...

 

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