Children see, and some children do

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webmaster | 01/12/13
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Here is how The Wall Street Journal describes a new television offering:

“An ice pick impales a woman’s eye in the first episode of the new TV thriller, ‘The Following.’ If the sequence hadn’t been scaled back to meet the guidelines of a major broadcast network, the scene would have been grislier.”

If that makes you want to see that show, something may be wrong with you. Why would a normal person want to watch a thing like that?

I know people are interested in portrayals of violence. They like boxing, wrestling and cage fighting. They like football and ice hockey. They enjoy films about wars and videos about blowing things and people up. But boxing matches and war movies seem tame compared to the carnage advertised by makers of video games for children.

We allow violence into our homes through television and the Internet, then we wonder what’s wrong when young men take guns with them into schools and shoot people. Compared to what they see on television and experience on video games, shooting up schools must seem tame.

And then there is pornography, which is so prevalent it seems normal. Illicit sex or sexual innuendo are the themes of most of television’s comedies and a great many dramas. I even saw a show on carpentry in which the host is a woman who wears hardly any clothes. Have the producers actually seen what carpenters wear?

Even cartoons are dirty. Surely you’ve watched “South Park.” It’s filth. And children watch it.

Fortunately, many good movies are still made. Take “Lincoln,” for example. It’s at the top of the Oscar heap this year, and it should be.

But the producers of scum movies and scum television programs will keep churning them out as long as we allow that stuff into our homes and put up with the results.

 

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