A certain lack of moral sense

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webmaster | 07/19/13
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It seems ludicrous to me that so much fuss is being made of the trial of George Zimmerman, a Hispanic, killing Trayvon Martin, an African-American teenager in Sanford, Fla. One would think it was the crime of the century, followed by the trial of the century. But it was neither. The conflict has largely been made up by people who should know better — the so-called legal experts of television and the Internet.

While the encounter between Zimmerman and Martin ended tragically, and the result of the trial angered many (Zimmerman was found innocent under Florida’s Stand Your Ground Law), it was small stuff compared to what goes on less than 200 miles from Madera every week.

In the city of Oakland, hundreds of mostly young, African-American males are slaughtered every year. They die mostly at the hands of African-American gang members. When the victims themselves aren’t gang members, they are often bystanders, some of whom are children.

Yet the city of Oakland does little to stem the combat. It only employs 18 police officers per 10,000 people — compared to 39 officers per 10,000 population in Detroit, another city where young men die in almost an epidemic of death.

When Gov. Jerry Brown, was mayor of Oakland, before he became attorney general, he was able to do little to end the carnage. The present mayor, Jean Quan, appears baffled by the problem. She seems hamstrung by political correctness. Police are held back.

After the Zimmerman verdict, some of the citizens of Oakland decided the thing to do to express their disappointment was to wreck their own neighborhoods. One man was almost killed.

And the deaths continue, as does the political finger-pointing.

Bill Cosby blames Oakland’s problem on what he calls the failure of some parents to take care of their young children and teach them moral behavior.

Truth be told, that probably was the case with both Zimmerman and Martin. Somewhere along the line, neither was able to summon the moral sense to do the right thing.

 

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